Traditional interior design takes influence from 18-19th Century European design, with a heavy emphasis on French Neoclassical. A traditional home includes styles from the British Colonial Revival, 18th Century English, and French Country. Traditional design celebrates symmetry. All design elements – from accessories to support columns – are symmetrical to create a focal point.

Traditional Furnishings and Accessories

Antiques with European influence and curved lines are a hallmark of Traditional design. Traditional furnishings are a mixture of comfort, luxury, and history, giving them timeless appeal. Oil paintings, tailored window coverings, plush textiles, and small floral patterns are classic and will never out of style.

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White Macaubas Honed quartzite sourced by Aria Stone Gallery. Image courtesy of Jenkins Interiors.

Natural Stone in Traditional Design

Natural stone is paramount in Traditional design and authentic, natural stone is key. Louis XVI cladded entire rooms and courtyards of the palace of Versailles in marble and quartzite. From there after, designers in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe began to incorporate marble and quartzite into their opulent home architecture.

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Calacatta Gold Borghini Extra marble sourced by Aria Stone Gallery, located in the Christopher Peacock Showroom in Dallas, TX.

Traditional Molding, Edge Details, and Support Beams

Crown molding and ornate edge details on the countertops are small details that will instantly make any design feel more Traditional. Looking up to the ceiling you may find wooden support beams -reminiscent of French Country Traditional – or a coffered ceiling to add dimension and appeal.

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Calacatta Gold Borghini Extra marble sourced by Aria Stone Gallery.

Ornate Hardware

Built in cabinetry with gold or brass knobs and accessories are trademarks of Traditional design.

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Onyx White Extra sourced by Aria Stone Gallery, located in the Christopher Peacock Showroom in Dallas, TX.

 

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